Empower Yourself: Do these 5 things for a better work-life

Linda Le Phan

Psychology Today estimates that the average American spends 90,000 hours of their life working, and according to Deloitte’s Shift Index Survey, 80% of people are dissatisfied with their jobs. The good news is that you have more control over your job satisfaction than you might know.

People who do these 5 things can achieve a better work life and subsequently greater satisfaction at work and at home.

Review companies before accepting an offer

Online platforms that provide transparent insight from current and past employees are a great way to learn who the company is on the inside before making the course-altering decision to take a new job. Kununu is provides perhaps the most comprehensive review, including individual ratings in 20 different categories including job security, handicap accessibility, company culture, eco-consciousness, work-life balance, compensation, and more. With this depth of information available at the click of a mouse, why would ever accept a job offer without doing your research again?

Speak up about your career goals

According to a  survey conducted by Georgetown University, 56% of senior executives admit to knowing who they wanted to promote before they even posted an open position internally.  This means that waiting around for an internal posting is the wrong way to go about it taking what’s yours, whether it’s a hard-earned promotion or a transfer to a new, more desirable position.

In order to ensure you’re on the radar, it’s imperative that your leaders know exactly what you want and what you’re willing to do to get it. Long hours? Check. Night classes? You’ll do those, too. Be transparent with your boss about your aspirations and your hunger and you’ll improve your favor – which, right or wrong, impacts your future opportunities.

Tell your bosses how you really feel

The  most common culprits for dissatisfaction at work include not liking the work you do, not liking the people you work with, or being charged with work that is too challenging or not challenging enough. While these aspects aren’t always within your control, they’re never within your control if you don’t speak up. Let your boss know how you’re feeling; after all, nobody is going to advocate for you except you. Many employees are pleasantly surprised to find that their satisfaction and opportunity improves when they’re transparent and solution-oriented.

Welcome constructive feedback

Consider yourself among the lucky if you work with people who are so transparent and dedicated to results that they’ll provide you with the truth – good, bad, or ugly. Learning to value and accept constructive criticism is the key to self-empowerment. When you open yourself to the expertise and life lessons and guidance of a wide variety of people from different walks of life, you create endless opportunity for professional growth and development. Better yet, you avoid the defensiveness, hurt feelings, and stress that can follow feedback that isn’t well-received.

Seek out solutions

When you identify a problem, direct your mental, emotional, and physical energy to identifying potential solutions. Not only do you empower yourself to solve your own problems and the problems of the company and your colleagues, but you demonstrate your ability to lead and direct and improve your chances of promotion.

Key Takeaways

While every factor will never be within your control, taking charge of those that are can empower you to reach personal enlightenment and professional success. Take these key points with you:

  • Use the tools available to you to research companies before accepting an offer
  • Make sure your boss knows where you want to take your career
  • Be honest and transparent with leaders and peers
  • Welcome feedback that helps you grow and develop, and
  • Use every challenge you encounter as an opportunity to identify a creative solution

share your voice

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Linda Le Phan is the Content Marketing Manager at kununu US, a place where job seekers can get an authentic view of life at a company and where employers have a trusted platform to better engage talent. That means that everything on the editorial calendar goes through her (want to write for us? learn more here). When she’s not creating content about the modern workplace, company culture, and life & work hacks, she is probably going out to get an iced coffee (even in Boston winter), raiding the snack drawer, or jamming to kununu’s Spotify playlist.